Having trouble viewing The Lady from the Sea right now? Try these six steps to fix your stream:

  1. Try refreshing your browser.  Don't forget to click the play button after it reloads.
  2. Try switching to a different browser.
  3. Try using the browser under 'incognito/private' mode.
  4. Try disabling any ad-blocking software or browser plugins
  5. Try a different device.
  6. Go to speedtest.net and test your internet bandwidth.  You'll want at least 2Mbps to view the video.

Which devices can I use to stream?

The platform works on mobile phones, computers, tablets, and smart TVs (with a web browser). If you have any of those, you can watch! We also recommend viewing with headphones for the best experience.

Are subtitles available?

Yes, closed captioning is available! Simply hover your mouse over the video player. In the bottom right corner, click on "CC off", then click on "english". Your video should now display captions. 

In addition, you may speed up or slow down the video playback by hovering your mouse over the video player. In the bottom right corner, click on "1x" and you will see several options to either increase or decrease playback speed. For optimal listening enjoyment, use headphones.

Can I watch the show on my TV, or do I have to watch it on my computer?

We’d love for you to cast the show to your big screen! The easiest option is to use Chrome Casting, AirPlay, or screen mirroring to play the stream from your phone, laptop or another device to your TV. You might see a slight decrease in quality with this option. You can also use an HDMI cable to connect your computer to the TV.

If your TV can access a web browser, you can open that browser and log into your email. From there, you can open the email we sent you and click on your link to stream. If you have trouble streaming on an older TV, you may have better luck switching to an alternate device.

Here is a list of steps for some common casting setups.

Unfortunately, due to the sheer number and variations of smart TVs and smart TV software, we aren’t able to troubleshoot individual hardware issues. This guide on casting may be useful to you, depending on your setup.

Where do I go to view the stream on-demand?

You’ll receive a confirmation email with the subject of “Link to View The Lady from the Sea.” In that email will be your unique link to view the performance. Use your custom link to watch on your laptop, tablet, mobile device—or mirror the show to your smart TV. Can’t find your confirmation email?  Be sure to check your junk/spam folder! If you have questions, please call us at (773) 753-4472.

What’s the ideal browser to use?

We recommend using the browser that gives you the quickest speeds for your everyday use. Our top choices are Google Chrome and Safari.

How can I ensure the best streaming experience?

If you’re experiencing issues, a first step might be to turn the wi-fi off on your other devices. Or, for the strongest connection, connect your device to your router directly with an ethernet cable.

How do I make a video full screen?

You'll find the full-screen button in the video player, depending on your device it will be in the lower right corner (on PC, for example) or the upper left (on iOS).

What should I do if I’m experiencing connection issues during the show (e.g. video is freezing or audio is not working)?

Your video may need a minute to load. If it is not playing continuously, try pausing it and stepping away for a few minutes and then continuing the show once it’s had a chance to pre-load more of the performance. If you are experiencing connection issues, it may be related to your browser settings, internet bandwidth, or it’s a device-specific issue.

While we can't guarantee and may not be able to troubleshoot the performance of your specific hardware setup, we have a few recommendations that we hope will help:

Who do I contact if I'm having trouble seeing the show?

We'll have phone support available from Monday through Saturday, 12noon-5pm to get you started streaming and to answer your questions! Call us at (773) 753-4472.

Can I watch the performance again after it’s over?

No, once you've started streaming the performance, you'll have 72 hours to finish watching. On-demand performances can be watched at any time between March 21 through April 10, 2022. 

What if I want to buy more than one viewing or buy for a friend?

No problem! Simply buy as many views (tickets) on the purchase page and you’ll receive that many links in your confirmation email.   

How do I access my digital playbill for the performance?

You’ll see the playbill button on the same page as the performance at the bottom.


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This adaptation of Othello gave me goosebumps that persisted long after the performance was over. I have a profound admiration and respect for each of the actors, for they all did a spectacular job conveying emotions through their body language and facial expressions. The simplicity of the staging amplified the creative boundaries and made for fascinating scenery. At one moment the scaffold was a boat going through a raging tempest, at another it was a balcony bustling with people, at another it was a bedroom where Desdemona awaited her death. The way that the lighting transformed the steelwork into spaces across time was beautiful. There were several elements of the play that brought us into close proximity with the characters. First, the literal proximity to the characters. I had Cassio nearly die right beside me. Desdemona looked me right in the eye and asked me to have mercy. Othello was so close that I could count every tear that streamed down his face. There was so much action that I often found myself looking all around me to try to take it all in. The impossibility to take it all in at once meant each audience member watched a slightly different version of the play, and this made me feel like I was a bystander—a true witness—to the events that went down. It was an incredibly immersive and intimate experience. Overall, I felt the play was brilliant and I will definitely be returning to Court Theatre.
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Court Theatre is excited to collaborate with The Covey Group for a series of post-show talkbacks about The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice beginning October 30th.
Exploring select moments, scenes, and characters, our facilitation team of haydee souffrant, rebecca brown, and Kelli Covey will invite the audience to step into the emotion and energy of the production, exploring the many shifting movements and feelings—exhilaration, anger, surprise, sadness—that shape this powerful story. We will also discuss the way Court's production translates the traditional narrative of Shakespeare’s play for their stage, addressing themes such as power, silence, identity, and what it means to be fully human. Audience members will be invited to consider how this production of The Tragedy of Othello challenges traditional productions. Talkbacks will occur after the following performances:

About the Facilitators

Kelli Covey is a trainer, facilitator, mediator, coach and organizational development consultantwith over 20 years’ experience working with both nonprofit organizations and corporations. Kelli was previously the co-director of the Center for Civic Reflection, where she trained hundreds of facilitators in the practice of reflective discussion, including teachers, probation officers, AmeriCorps members, librarians, and organizational and community leaders. She also served as Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at Teach for America-Chicago, a large educational organization focused on educationalequity.Kelli is a certified mediator through the Chicago-based Center for Conflict Resolution (CCR). She mediates regularly in the Cook County court system and handles a variety of mediation cases, including victim-offender mediation, tenant/landlord,and juvenile and family mediation. She also leads conflict management workshops for CCR and serves on the continuing education committee. Kelli is an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation proud to have served as a recent board member and treasurer for the American Indian Center, one of the oldest urban-based Native membership community centers in the United States. She continues to support AIC as a community member, volunteer and consultant. rebecca brown (she/they) is a dynamic facilitator, trainer, consultant, project manager and poet. She often describes herself as “made of questions (that don’t always need answers)” and is pleased to bring her creative thinking, deep listening and engaging facilitation skills to each project. rebecca forged over 15 years of nonprofit experience and leadership as a program director with an award-winningChicago area literary non-profit organization, designing and facilitating book group discussions and poetry writing circles with youth in under-resourced communities, as well as training others to do so. She has built her consultation and project management skills over the last five years, including becoming a trained practitioner of racial healing circles and supporting organizations in racial equity assessments, education and planning. rebecca is proud to share her skills for simultaneous big-picture/small-detail thinking, comfort with uncertainty and continuous learning, dedication to reflection, and capacity for finding the right questions to move forward with all her project partners.
haydee r. souffranthaydee souffrant (she/her) is a Chicago-based Haitian American writer, producer, and certified mediator through the Chicago-based Center for Conflict Resolution (CCR). Many of her artist workshops incorporate creative writing, meditation and facilitated discussions on healing and restorative justice practices for people of color, artists, educators, youth and adult audiences.In her 12 years as an arts administrator, souffrant’s professional and creative work has focused on production stage management, production and community arts program, and facilitations for both profit and nonprofit organizations, theaters, gallery and storefront venues such as Illinois Caucus of Adolescent Health, Theater on the Lake, Berger Park Theater, Links Hall, MPAACT at The Greenhouse Theater, The Chicago Mosaic School, The Black Revolutionary Theatre Workshop (New York), Dramatic Questions Theatre (New York) and additional theaters and artist spaces.

About The Covey Group

The Covey Group is a small group of dedicated partners committed to providing high-quality training, facilitation, consulting, and professional development, with a special focus on reflection and dialogue. Their mission is to support and engage individuals, organizations, and communities in creating a more meaningful, inclusive, and just world through practices of reflection, dialogue, and shared inquiry.

Header photo of Kelvin Roston, Jr. in THE TRAGEDY OF OTHELLO, THE MOOR OF VENICE by Michael Brosilow.
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Learn more in this blog focusing on the role of Assistant Director and Associate Dramaturg Abigail Henkin." ["_article_description"]=> string(19) "field_5927045f742d7" ["article_byline"]=> string(58) "By Carissa Villagomez, Marketing and Communications Intern" ["_article_byline"]=> string(19) "field_592de516b020a" ["add_feed"]=> string(1) "0" ["_add_feed"]=> string(19) "field_5939a562bed44" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_category"]=> string(2) "14" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_production-section"]=> string(3) "502" } ["___content":protected]=> NULL ["_permalink":protected]=> NULL ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(16274) ["ID"]=> int(16274) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "9" ["post_content"]=> string(8146) "The company of THE TRAGEDY OF OTHELLO, THE MOOR OF VENICE in rehearsal. Since April 2020, Abigail Henkin, then student and now UChicago graduate, has been working on the creative team for Court Theatre’s upcoming production of The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice. During that time, the team’s approach to the play has evolved as its members process social upheaval and discover creative possibilities during production meetings.  For over a year, a series of private salons have been orchestrated among Court creatives like Henkin, who is Assistant Director and Associate Dramaturg of the production. The salons present an extraordinary opportunity for collaboration between designers, directors, actors, dramaturgs, and anyone else on the team who has a unique idea to share. The purpose of these sessions, Henkin declares, is “pretty all-encompassing” as they offer a virtual space for the artists to discover the vision of the production alongside its co-directors, Marilyn F. Vitale Artistic Director Charles Newell and performance scholar and Northwestern PhD Candidate Gabrielle Randle-Bent. A critical decision that the team arrived at early in the process was to re-center the character of Othello in a play that is often overrun by Iago. The question “What is the tragedy of each of these characters?”, particularly female characters who are often overlooked or underestimated, was vital to their discussions. However, putting Othello at the forefront was also paramount. Changing the production title from “Othello” to its original complete title “The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice” was a pivotal step on that journey of centering a character who is often written over in favor of Iago in several traditional performances. Such a trend can be attributed to Shakespeare’s text itself, as numerous asides and frequent lines ensure that Iago has a greater textual presence and power in the play than Othello. Considering Shakespeare’s construction of the text, Iago tends to take over unless a production intervenes through its staging. Court’s production aims to recenter Othello. Each word in “The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice” is necessary because, as Henkin says, it “tells something about the character and what world he is occupying.” Furthermore, the title change also demonstrates the team’s commitment to work beyond the typical assumptions surrounding the play and break free from the developed traditions that often dictate how characters in this play are typically performed.  The acknowledgment of “Venice” in the title also manifests the team’s attention to the location as a presence that can be evoked even when the production is not strictly grounded in 1500s Venice. Emerging from Henkin’s in-depth dramaturgical work was the realization that Venice was a place of cultural diversity as a meeting place between the East and West, and that revelation has informed casting and design decisions. A variety of documents informed Henkin’s knowledge of Venice as a complicated yet lively society and how the tensions within it still resonate today. Henkin’s role as Associate Dramaturg meant that she was often in pursuit of resources, and the pandemic context during which this production has been conceptualized means that her research has been conducted online. That virtual condition has not stopped Henkin from finding fascinating texts that have become integral to shaping the production. A few resources that stood out in Henkin’s memory include texts from Professor Noémie Ndiaye’s Black Shakespeare class and the Court coordinated series Black Baroque, such as Debra Ann Byrd’s Becoming Othello: A Black Girl’s Journey and Keith Hamilton Cobb’s American Moor to challenge the stereotypical expectations of an Othello performer. Other sources were Margaret F. Rosenthal’s The Honest Courtesan: Veronica Franco, Citizen and Writer in Sixteenth-Century Venice to think about Bianca and the portrayal of women, and Toni Morrison’s Desdemona, discussed alongside Professor Ndiaye, also was helpful in exploring the bonds between Iago and Othello and Othello and Desdemona. Such texts further prompted the team’s commitment to treating each character as a complex human being who has a life beyond the play’s pages. Henkin reveals that a significant realization was “you can’t hate anyone without a strong emotional connection.” That discovery marked a transitional moment in understanding the characters as starting from a place of profound love and deep human connection rather than jealousy. The creatives have applied this understanding to their long-standing goal of, as Henkin puts it, “breaking assumptions about these characters” and “telling this brutal story in a way that is healing instead of reinscribing trauma.” The process of creating The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice has been a unique experience due to its pandemic context. Henkin notes that the team has not yet assembled in-person for their meetings, but that she looks forward to meeting everyone, following COVID guidelines, for the first rehearsal. The production also has an unexpected advantage: since there are no shows before it, the team gets to rehearse in the assembled set onstage. This scenario provides incredible opportunities for new creative discoveries that come with interacting with the physical space from early on in the rehearsal process.  When asked how these salon sessions have influenced her as a creator, Henkin shares how much it meant to her that everyone’s perspective was given space to be aired. “It was incredibly rewarding to be respected coming in as a student and having my voice as a professional heard by the thoughtful leadership of Charlie and Gabby,” Henkin says. This production marks the incredible start of Henkin’s professional artistic journey and Court Theatre’s transition back to live performances.  Learn more about The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice, and buy your tickets today Photo of the company of THE TRAGEDY OF OTHELLO, THE MOOR OF VENICE in rehearsal (Ervin-Eickhoff)." ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2021-09-13 11:27:26" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["post_title"]=> string(21) "Process and Evolution" ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["slug"]=> string(21) "process-and-evolution" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_edit_lock"]=> string(12) "1631550446:9" ["_edit_last"]=> string(1) "9" ["_thumbnail_id"]=> string(5) "16276" ["_yoast_wpseo_content_score"]=> string(2) "30" ["_yoast_wpseo_estimated-reading-time-minutes"]=> string(1) "5" ["article_description"]=> string(227) "How did more than a year of salon conversations inform Court's production of THE TRAGEDY OF OTHELLO, THE MOOR OF VENICE? Learn more in this blog focusing on the role of Assistant Director and Associate Dramaturg Abigail Henkin." 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Check out the cast of THE TRAGEDY OF OTHELLO, THE MOOR OF VENICE!" ["_article_description"]=> string(19) "field_5927045f742d7" ["article_byline"]=> string(0) "" ["_article_byline"]=> string(19) "field_592de516b020a" ["add_feed"]=> string(1) "0" ["_add_feed"]=> string(19) "field_5939a562bed44" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_category"]=> string(2) "14" ["_thumbnail_id"]=> string(5) "16322" } ["___content":protected]=> NULL ["_permalink":protected]=> NULL ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(16241) ["ID"]=> int(16241) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "9" ["post_content"]=> string(13364) " Court's upcoming production of William Shakespeare's The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice features an all-star roster of actors bringing the famous tragedy to life. From familiar faces to newcomers to Court's stage, the passion and artistry of this team is sure to inject Shakespeare's tragedy with humanity and raw emotion. Learn more about the cast below!
Sheldon Brown (Cassio) is a graduate of Emerson College and happy to return to the Court stage where his previous credits include Oedipus Rex and Man in the Ring. His other credits include This Bitter Earth and Time Is On Our Side at About Face Theatre, A Wonder In My Soul at Victory Gardens Theatre, The Shipment at Red Tape Theatre, and 1980 with Jackalope Theatre and more. He also has numerous credits in Boston including The Grand Inquisitor, directed by Peter Brook through ArtsEmerson. His film credits include Cicada (NewFest Audience Award, OutFest, BFI Film Festival, Frameline Film Festival), and The Canyonlands.
 
Amanda DrinkallAmanda Drinkall (Desdemona) was most recently seen in Bernhardt/Hamlet at Goodman Theatre, where her credits include: Venus in Fur, A Winter’s Tale, Measure for Measure, Continuity, and Ah, Wilderness! Other Chicago credits include: Mary Page Marlowe (Steppenwolf Theatre-World Premiere); King Charles III (Chicago Shakespeare); Sheltered (Alliance Theatre); White Guy on the Bus, Funnyman, By the Water (Northlight); Southern Gothic (Windy City Playhouse); Significant Other (About Face); Dutchman (American Blues); Pygmalion (Oak Park Festival); Rest (Victory Gardens), Great Expectations (Strawdog); The Last Train to Nibroc (Haven Theatre-Jeff Award-Best Actress); and more than 20 shows with The Back Room Shakespeare Project, where she is a Partner. Television & Film credits include: The View From TallChicago Med, and Bobby & Iza.  Ms. Drinkall holds a BFA from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and is represented by Gray Talent Group.
 
Cruz Gonzalez-Cadel (Emilia) is an award winning actor based in Chicago. She is thrilled to return to Court Theatre's stage, where she was last seen in Electra. Born and raised in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Cruz received her degree in acting from the Universidad del Salvador. She is an ensemble member at Teatro Vista where she was seen in Hope: Part II of a Mexican Trilogy, The Abuelas, La Havana Madrid and i put the fear of mexico in 'em. Other selected Chicago credits include: Twelfth Night & Measure for Measure (Chicago Shakespeare Theater), Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (Lookingglass Theatre) the critically acclaimed Lela & Co. (Steep Theatre), which earned her a Jeff Award for Performance in a Principal Role–Play, You on the Moors Now (The Hypocrites) and The Compass (Steppenwolf Theatre Company). TV/Film credits include: Fargo (FX), Chicago Med (NBC), The Chi (Showtime), Empire (Fox), and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. She is a proud member of SAG-AFTRA and AEA and is represented by Stewart Talent. Visit www.cruzgonzalezcadel.com
 

Sean FortunatoSean Fortunato (Brabantio/Montano) last appeared at Court as Gallimard in M. Butterfly.  Credits include: Miss Trunchbull in Matilda (Drury Lane Theatre); Malvolio in Twelfth Night, Death of a Streetcar Named Virginia WoolfThe Diary of Anne FrankHedda Gabler, The Real ThingTravels with My Aunt (Writers Theatre); Joseph in Book of JosephKing Charles III (Chicago Shakespeare Theater); 2666, Measure For Measure (Goodman Theatre); and work at Northlight Theatre, TimeLine Theatre, Theatre at the Center, Remy Bumppo Theatre, Marriott Theatre, About Face Theatre, Peninsula Players, Intiman Theatre, Old Globe Theatre, and The Duke on 42nd, NY.  TV/Film: Antoon Dumini in Fargo (FX); Chicago PD, Chicago Med, Chicago Fire (NBC); and The Merry Gentleman.  Sean has received eight Joseph Jefferson nominations and an After Dark Award.

Erik HellmanErik Hellman (Roderigo) returns to Court where he was previously seen in The MousetrapHarveyOne Man, Two GuvnorsThe Misanthrope; Proof (Jeff nomination); Comedy of Errors; The Mystery of Irma Vep (Jeff nomination); Titus Andronicus; and Arcadia, among others. Other recent credits include LindiweFamiliar, and The Burn at Steppenwolf; Smart People and Marjorie Prime at Writers Theatre; Miss Bennet (Jeff nomination) and Lost In Yonkers at Northlight Theatre; Taming of the Shrew and The Madness of King George III at Chicago Shakespeare; and Luna Gale at Goodman. Film/TV work includes The Dark KnightWaldenBossChicago FireChicago PDThe Good FightMrs. AmericaFargo, and the upcoming series 61st St.
Timothy Edward Kane (Iago) is pleased to return to Court for his fourteenth production having most recently appeared in An Iliad. Other Chicago credits include Buried ChildRosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, and Arms and the Man (Writers); Faceless, Lost in Yonkers, and She Stoops to Conquer (Northlight); Blood and Gifts (TimeLine); The North Plan (Steppenwolf Garage), and 23 productions at Chicago Shakespeare including Tug of War: Civil Strife and Henry IV Parts 1 & 2 (CST & RSC). Regional credits: The Mark Taper Forum, Notre Dame Shakespeare, Peninsula Players, and the Illinois Shakespeare Festival. TV: Chicago Fire (NBC), Chicago P.D. (NBC), and Empire (FOX). Mr. Kane is married to actress Kate Fry with whom he has two sons and he is an Assistant Professor at Loyola University Chicago.

Karissa Murrell MyersKarissa Murrell Myers (Duke) is a Chicago-based multidisciplinary theatre artist originally from Boise, Idaho. Her acting credits include working at Renaissance Theaterworks, Goodman Theatre, Remy Bumppo, and The House Theatre of Chicago. Television work: Chicago MedChicago PDElectric Dreams, and The Exorcist. Karissa holds an MFA in Performance from the University of Hawaii at Manoa, a BA in Theatre Arts from Boise State University, and is a graduate of The School at Steppenwolf. Member of SAG-AFTRA. Represented by Gray Talent Group. Visit www.kmurrellmyers.com.
Darren Patin AKA Chicago Drag Queen, Ari Gato (Bianca) is making their Court Theatre debut playing the part of Bianca. Darren recently associate directed Kinky Boots at the Paramount Theatre and appeared in shows with Porchlight Music Theatre, Raven Theatre, and Lifeline Theatre. As Ari, they have graced the stages of North Halstead, Steppenwolf, and Black Girl Magic. They serve as the Co-Head Chair of Artists/Entertainers for the Chicago Black Drag Council, a group formed to help create safe spaces for Black people in the Chicago queer scene. They hope you enjoy the show!
 

Kelvin Roston, Jr.Kelvin Roston, Jr. (Othello) Court credits: Oedipus Rex (Oedipus), King Hedley II (King Hedley), Five Guys Named Moe (Four-Eyed Moe), Seven Guitars (Floyd Barton), Porgy and Bess (Jim/Crown), Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom (Sylvester). Chicagoland: Congo Square, Paramount, Marriott-Lincolnshire, Goodman, ITC, Eta, Writers, Black Ensemble, Timeline, Northlight, Steppenwolf. Regional: The Black Rep (St. Louis, MO), Fulton (Lancaster, PA), New Theatre (Overland Park, KS), MSMT (Brunswick, ME), Baltimore Center Stage (Baltimore, MD), Mosaic (Washington DC), Apollo (New York, NY). International: Orb (Tokyo, Japan), Festival Hall (Osaka, Japan). Television: Chicago Med, Chicago PDSouth Side, KFC, Instant Care, Ace Hardware. Film: Get a JobPrincess CydBreathing Room. Awards: Jeff Award, 3 BTA Awards, 2 Black Excellence Awards, NAMI Award. AEA, Paonessa Talent.


Want to see these talented actors in action? Get your tickets to The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice today!In addition to live performances, a digital version will be available to stream on-demand. Get digital tickets →
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["_article_description"]=> string(19) "field_5927045f742d7" ["article_byline"]=> string(0) "" ["_article_byline"]=> string(19) "field_592de516b020a" ["add_feed"]=> string(1) "0" ["_add_feed"]=> string(19) "field_5939a562bed44" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_category"]=> string(2) "14" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_production-section"]=> string(3) "354" ["_thumbnail_id"]=> string(5) "16123" } ["___content":protected]=> NULL ["_permalink":protected]=> NULL ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(16018) ["ID"]=> int(16018) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "12" ["post_content"]=> string(8014) "In this time of theatrical experimentation, we wanted our audiences to get a behind-the-scenes glimpse into our upcoming production, Titanic (Scenes from the British Wreck Commissioner's Inquiry, 1912). Associate Director of Marketing and Content Creation Brent Ervin-Eickhoff held a Zoom conversation with sound designer and composer Mikhail Fiksel to get insight into the process. To find out more about the incredible creation journey of this show, read on!   What’s the role of sound in the production? The production is informed by traditional live theatre, audio plays, and investigative journalism podcasts. It’s staged in a minimalistic style, so the production’s dynamics are executed mostly through sound. The performers are inside audio isolation booths. We have microphones through those areas so we can access their voices. There’s also additional content—music, voice manipulation—that creates the transformation we’re used to in theatre. Through sound, we’re transported to the Titanic and to the internal space of the characters. What you hear is what takes you on the journey.    What were unique challenges in this production? One of the biggest challenges has been figuring out what this experience wants to be. This piece went through many iterations. Originally, it was conceived as a live performance that was sonically driven, with audiences in the theatre and at home listening on headphones. Then, it was an audio play. Then, we tried to adapt this into a screenplay. It has found its way in the Venn diagram of all these experiences.  Another challenge is that, in rehearsal and the capturing process, we only get a partial picture. A lot happens in post-production, which you don’t have in live theatre. We have to think several steps ahead because we don’t get to experience the fully realized vision until the edited product is complete. During rehearsal, I introduce sound design so that the actors experience everything like an audience member. As they perform, they hear the sonic manipulation that is utilized. Everybody in the performance and rehearsal has to use headphones. We have a network of more than a dozen headphone stations. When you walk into the theatre during rehearsal, it’s a silent experience until you put on headphones, and that’s when you understand the play for what it is.  Some of our collaborators are not with us in person for pandemic restrictions, so we stream it for remote folks so they experience it as we do. It’s a very unique way of doing theatre. We’ve learned a lot, and I feel very good about what we’ve accomplished. I hope we can take these lessons with us when we’re back to producing live theatre.   How do your sound design and composition deepen the audience experience? Through sound, we provide an intimacy that allows us to subvert restrictions imposed on us by the pandemic. Social distancing creates an accessibility challenge for the performer. With microphones, we provide access otherwise not available even in a live performance. You’re inches away from them, sonically. That level of intimacy creates opportunity for empathy. You experience what the character goes through, whether that’s memories of the traumatic experience or them in the moment wrestling with the aftermath.  When information is visually limited, we rely on our other senses. It’s a catalyst for the imagination, and we have visceral responses. That strengthens empathetic response and investment in the story. We rely on the audience to imagine and complete the action. This approach is meant to encourage the audience to lean in, be part of the experience, and wrestle with the questions explored in this piece. There are parallels between that situation 109 years ago and what we’re living through now; having these fresh experiences on our end and injecting them into the narrative of the Titanic aftermath creates an interesting journey.   Is there anything else you’d like audiences to know? I encourage the audience to use headphones. It’s not a restrictive requirement, but I recommend it because we’re leaning into the fidelity and the immersiveness of the sound design to elevate the experience, so I want folks at home to get that full effect.  We as a production team are working hard to maintain the theatricality of the experience. We’re giving you the full picture; it’s captured with multiple cameras, and all are available to you. It’s designed to be as close to the experience of watching from a live audience, where you see the whole stage and you use your agency to look at what you want to. This experience is not meant to be consumed while you’re doing something else. Invite your loved ones, but everybody put on your headphones. If you can stream it on your TV as well, you get both the intimacy and the verisimilitude of sitting in a theatre. It’s a new way of consuming theatre, but it’s an interesting one and not dissimilar from how we consume other media. I’m interested in how the emerging intersection of these platforms can inform each other in future art and open up creative opportunities on all these platforms.   Do you have a favorite sound cue in the production? Being asked that is like being asked who’s your favorite child?, so it’s tough to answer. It’s also difficult because we are mid-process. A lot happens in post-production, so I’m looking forward to making more discoveries and working with the director to expand the world we’ve built.  I also want to note how we’ve incorporated dramaturgical discoveries into the sound design. Under the leadership of director Vanessa Stalling, we found that there was a considerable amount of communication happening between the Titanic and other ships and locations via wireless radio. There were Marconi grams going back and forth before the disaster and while the ship was sinking. We found the transcripts of these transmissions, and they’ve become the building block for sonic content. There was a lot of attempted communication with other ships, but there were jamming signals. This idea of crossing wires and communication challenges feels timely but also created an opportunity for rich sonic experiences.  I’m very eager to learn from the audience experience because I’m of the opinion that we should be doing hybrid work like this all the time. It creates opportunities for playwriting and accessibility, and it can open up what we define as “theatre”. I hope this is a helpful experiment as we continue challenging and expanding the form. Titanic (Scenes from the British Wreck Commissioner’s Inquiry, 1912) is available for streaming on demand from June 14 to July 11, 2021. Purchase tickets here." 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["_article_description"]=> string(19) "field_5927045f742d7" ["article_byline"]=> string(0) "" ["_article_byline"]=> string(19) "field_592de516b020a" ["add_feed"]=> string(1) "0" ["_add_feed"]=> string(19) "field_5939a562bed44" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_category"]=> string(2) "14" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_production-section"]=> string(3) "354" ["_thumbnail_id"]=> string(5) "16123" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-06-04 18:56:50" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(46) "q-a-with-titanic-sound-designer-mikhail-fiksel" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2021-06-04 14:14:07" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-06-04 19:14:07" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.courttheatre.org/?p=16018" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["status"]=> string(7) "publish" } [6]=> object(Timber\Post)#3363 (51) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(13) { ["_edit_lock"]=> string(13) "1622831099:12" ["_edit_last"]=> string(2) "12" ["_yoast_wpseo_content_score"]=> string(2) "30" ["_yoast_wpseo_estimated-reading-time-minutes"]=> string(1) "5" ["article_description"]=> string(154) "Cameron's 1997 film versus McCafferty's 2012 play. Judging from the categories of accuracy, cultural importance, creativity, and analysis, which will win?" ["_article_description"]=> string(19) "field_5927045f742d7" ["article_byline"]=> string(58) "By Carissa Villagomez, Marketing and Communications Intern" ["_article_byline"]=> string(19) "field_592de516b020a" ["add_feed"]=> string(1) "0" ["_add_feed"]=> string(19) "field_5939a562bed44" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_category"]=> string(2) "14" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_production-section"]=> string(3) "354" ["_thumbnail_id"]=> string(5) "15930" } ["___content":protected]=> NULL ["_permalink":protected]=> NULL ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(15780) ["ID"]=> int(15780) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "12" ["post_content"]=> string(7574) "Owen McCafferty’s play was first performed 100 years after the sinking of RMS Titanic and 15 years after the release of James Cameron’s blockbuster. Though the film has contributed to the persistent fascination and mythos surrounding the ship, McCafferty’s play arguably remains the more important cultural product out of the two for its address of aspects about the tragedy that the movie did not do justice. Here are our reasons why McCafferty’s play is better:
  1. It’s historically accurate.
The play depicts real people and their real words, extracted from testimonies spoken at the actual commission. McCafferty and Cameron acknowledge their works are not historical documents, but their areas of creative license differ in their magnitude and effect on understanding Titanic’s legacy. McCafferty gives the voices of real people more reign.  2. It portrays an event many don’t know about. Several people know about the crash and rescue, but what about the aftermath? With McCafferty’s play, the audience recognizes that the story did not end when the survivors were picked up. It continued for far longer with two inquiries: the British inquiry, which is the subject of McCafferty’s work, and the US inquiry. Details of history are brought to light in an engaging theatrical encounter. 3. It scrutinizes class inequality. The play inventories all the luxury items onboard and surveys the consequences of placing material wealth before life. It challenges the audience to think deeper about why things onboard were the way they were and the consequences of such divides. 4. It interrogates repressed guilt as a human response to a fatal mistake. The human reactions feel more authentic in McCafferty’s play. The survivors went through significant trauma, with many of them playing an active role in events leading up to and during the tragedy. Many of them are defensive and quick to anger as their testimonies are questioned. The play gives a glimpse into the more complex human response to tragedy as those involved grapple with the role they played and their persistent denial of their survivor’s guilt.  5. It shows the humans and series of commands behind the tragedy. McCafferty’s play portrays everything involved in the ship’s sinking. It shows the chain of command and how orders were issued and followed. The tragedy wasn’t wholly a surprise; there was a chain of propelling decisions that contributed to the crash, such as forcing the ship to travel faster even when doing so meant endangering those aboard. Grappling with such decisions to follow orders contributes to portraying the crew involved as part of a human system that is responsive to the whims of those in power and structured to punish individual thought. 6. It explores the significance of the ship as a symbol for fatal hubris. The actions upon the ship and the interviewers’ incredulous responses demonstrate how those close to the ship were so caught up with trying to be unrivalled that they refused to recognize fatal faults. RMS Titanic lingers in historical memory as a symbol of the price of hubris. 7. It portrays real life consequences. The story of this ship has never really concluded. It persists in popular culture as an oddly romanticized story due to Cameron’s film. However, this tragedy was real and had major personal, financial, and marine travel-related repercussions. With all the money and publicity poured into the ship, there needed to be formal answers for why it sank. As a result of its sinking, maritime travel laws were updated to address factors, such as the number of lifeboats, that affected the death toll.  8. It explores the fallibility of memory. Titanic the film approaches the tragedy as if memory remains stable throughout the years and is a perfect document of what exactly happened. McCafferty’s play interrogates the more realistic fluidity of memory, particularly around a traumatic event, as the witnesses are questioned repeatedly but are not always steadfast in their recount of all the various details. This changing of details reflects the shifting, unreliable nature of memory more truthfully.  9. It doesn’t romanticize tragedy. The play examines the deeper societal divides that the tragedy represents in its numbers. It examines the course of action as it was taken and how it reflects more serious problems of class difference and social-and-work hierarchies, as well as how people are affected by trauma when they refuse to recognize their role in it. The play doesn’t portray the Titanic as a glamorous ship that is a symbol of desire to be someone else. Instead, it focuses on the excessive, unnecessary show of wealth that the ship prioritized over safety and humanity. It deconstructs the inflated symbolism of the ship by challenging why people think of it as glamorous when it really encapsulates major socio economic ills that persist today.  10. It shows the moral ambiguity beyond a door. “There was most certainly room on the door. Rose is a murderer!” While true there was room, McCafferty puts a halt to that famous conversation by appraising the deeper questions of culpability and accountability surrounding the incident. Are the shipmates who followed orders and actively propelled the ship toward danger responsible for the deaths? What about Cosmo Duff-Gordon and Joseph Ismay? The White Star line? The existing social systems in place that made the class disparity in the death toll even worse? All of them? Is it fair to place judgment on these historical figures if we ourselves don’t really know how we would behave in the same situation? McCafferty dares you to think deeper and more critically. Want to judge for yourself just how much better Titanic (Scenes from the British Wreck Commissioner’s Inquiry, 1912) is? Find more information on how to stream our production here." ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2021-06-04 13:27:18" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["post_title"]=> string(71) "10 Reasons Owen McCafferty’s Titanic Is Better Than James Cameron’s" ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["slug"]=> string(65) "10-reasons-owen-mccaffertys-titanic-is-better-than-james-camerons" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_edit_lock"]=> string(13) "1622831099:12" ["_edit_last"]=> string(2) "12" ["_yoast_wpseo_content_score"]=> string(2) "30" ["_yoast_wpseo_estimated-reading-time-minutes"]=> string(1) "5" ["article_description"]=> string(154) "Cameron's 1997 film versus McCafferty's 2012 play. Judging from the categories of accuracy, cultural importance, creativity, and analysis, which will win?" 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["_article_description"]=> string(19) "field_5927045f742d7" ["article_byline"]=> string(58) "By Carissa Villagomez, Marketing and Communications Intern" ["_article_byline"]=> string(19) "field_592de516b020a" ["add_feed"]=> string(1) "0" ["_add_feed"]=> string(19) "field_5939a562bed44" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_category"]=> string(2) "14" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_production-section"]=> string(3) "354" ["_thumbnail_id"]=> string(5) "15930" } ["___content":protected]=> NULL ["_permalink":protected]=> NULL ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(15770) ["ID"]=> int(15770) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "12" ["post_content"]=> string(3978) "The story of the Titanic has pervaded popular culture from the moment the news of its sinking spread. Mere days after the experience, Titanic survivor Dorothy Gibson appeared in the silent film short Saved from the Titanic, which she authored. Such sensationalized fascination about the tragedy persists, manifesting in musicals, films, and beyond. Here is our roundup of Titanic’s appearances in popular culture all around the world:
  1. James Cameron’s Titanic film
Still one of the top grossing films in global history, Cameron’s 1997 film reigns as the most recognized cultural product from the ship’s tragedy all over the world. The film, in turn, has been referenced in numerous other art products, such as A Thousand Splendid Suns by award-winning author Khaled Hosseini.
  1. Titanic, the Musical
The musical Titanic by Peter Stone and Maury Yeston opened on Broadway in 1997, quickly winning five Tony Awards soon after its release and eventually embarking on a world tour. 
  1. A Night to Remember
Walter Lord’s nonfiction book, published in 1955, is still considered one of the best sources to learn more about the disaster. The novel was adapted into a film of the same name in 1958.
  1. "The Sinking of the Titanic"
This musical composition by Gavin Bryars was inspired by the legend of the orchestra who played while the ship sank. It recreates the music played and what it would have sounded like underwater, as well as the remnants of sound that reverberated in the waters long after those who played it perished. Other Titanic-inspired songs can be accessed from our informal playlist!
  1. Shine
A character in Black American folklore, the legend of Shine melded with that of the Titanic for one of his stories. In this spoken-word piece (called a toast), Shine escapes death by refusing to be swayed by the promises of the white passengers and crew who swear to give him whatever he wants if he saves them. The Titanic is depicted as a warning of white hubris. The legend of RMS Titanic lives on in the memory of popular culture. Can you think of other cultural products inspired by the ship’s tragedy? Tell us in the comments below! Find out more information about our production here." ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2021-06-04 13:13:54" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["post_title"]=> string(28) "TITANIC: Pop Culture Roundup" ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["slug"]=> string(27) "titanic-pop-culture-roundup" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_edit_lock"]=> string(13) "1622830300:12" ["_edit_last"]=> string(2) "12" ["_yoast_wpseo_content_score"]=> string(2) "30" ["_yoast_wpseo_estimated-reading-time-minutes"]=> string(1) "2" ["article_description"]=> string(67) "Review our list of TITANIC's appearances in films, music, and more." ["_article_description"]=> string(19) "field_5927045f742d7" ["article_byline"]=> string(58) "By Carissa Villagomez, Marketing and Communications Intern" ["_article_byline"]=> string(19) "field_592de516b020a" ["add_feed"]=> string(1) "0" ["_add_feed"]=> string(19) "field_5939a562bed44" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_category"]=> string(2) "14" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_production-section"]=> string(3) "354" ["_thumbnail_id"]=> string(5) "15930" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-06-04 18:13:54" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(27) "titanic-pop-culture-roundup" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2021-06-04 13:13:54" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-06-04 18:13:54" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.courttheatre.org/?p=15770" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["status"]=> string(7) "publish" } [8]=> object(Timber\Post)#3361 (50) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(12) { ["_edit_lock"]=> string(13) "1622829554:12" ["_edit_last"]=> string(2) "12" ["_yoast_wpseo_content_score"]=> string(2) "30" ["article_description"]=> string(110) "Learn more about Joseph Laroche, the only Black passenger on the Titanic, and his impact on the ship's legacy." ["_article_description"]=> string(19) "field_5927045f742d7" ["article_byline"]=> string(58) "By Carissa Villagomez, Marketing and Communications Intern" ["_article_byline"]=> string(19) "field_592de516b020a" ["add_feed"]=> string(1) "0" ["_add_feed"]=> string(19) "field_5939a562bed44" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_category"]=> string(2) "14" ["_yoast_wpseo_estimated-reading-time-minutes"]=> string(1) "2" ["_thumbnail_id"]=> string(5) "15928" } ["___content":protected]=> NULL ["_permalink":protected]=> NULL ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(15152) ["ID"]=> int(15152) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "12" ["post_content"]=> string(3414) "As a result of deeper research into Laroche’s life and tragic death, more works have been released about his story. From professors to musicians to authors, Laroche has emerged as an important figure with respect to the legacy of Titanic's dominant white narrative and fatal anti-blackness.  Serge Bilé, an Ivorian-French author, wrote Black Man on the Titanic: The Story of Joseph Laroche, published by Mango Publishing Group in late 2019. The book takes information from research and constructs it in narrative style to retell the stories of Laroche’s life and the family’s boarding of the ship. Sprinkled throughout the text are pictures as well. Bilé investigated in both Haiti, the country of Laroche’s birth, and France, where Laroche went to study and met his wife. As for music, LaRoche, a three act opera by Atlanta artist Sharon J. Willis, was featured in the 2003 National Black Arts Festival. Dr. Kellie Carter Jackson, the Knafel Assistant Professor of the Humanities in the Department of Africana Studies at Wellesley, did a presentation in early 2020 regarding her research into Laroche’s life and fateful encounter with Titanic. In her lecture, she argues anti-blackness drove Laroche to the Titanic. As anti-blackness in French society prevented him from social and economic mobility, he boarded the vessel during his journey back home after receiving a job offer from his uncle. In his attempt to return to Haiti for greater opportunity and a home in which he would not be discriminated against, he boarded the doomed ship. Though Laroche’s story has been researched in more depth than it has in the past, many people still do not know his story; there is not much on it within the domain of mainstream popular culture. As suggested by Professor Carter Jackson and Zondra Hughes, a playwright who reviewed Bilé’s book, had James Cameron’s infamous film featured Joseph Laroche and Juliette Lafargue in the main roles, then it would be not only accurate but significant in recognizing the true stories that challenge the assumptions perpetuated by such media regarding the ship. Laroche’s story challenges the dominant white narrative around Titanic's legacy as a behemoth meant to symbolically laud white wealth in the ship's extravagant design and testifies to the blocked socioeconomic mobility impacting black people from Haiti and other former colonies who lived in France during his lifetime." 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["_article_description"]=> string(19) "field_5927045f742d7" ["article_byline"]=> string(58) "By Carissa Villagomez, Marketing and Communications Intern" ["_article_byline"]=> string(19) "field_592de516b020a" ["add_feed"]=> string(1) "0" ["_add_feed"]=> string(19) "field_5939a562bed44" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_category"]=> string(2) "14" ["_yoast_wpseo_estimated-reading-time-minutes"]=> string(1) "4" ["_thumbnail_id"]=> string(5) "15926" } ["___content":protected]=> NULL ["_permalink":protected]=> NULL ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(15051) ["ID"]=> int(15051) ["post_author"]=> string(2) "12" ["post_content"]=> string(6277) "The speedy hare racing the tortoise. Odysseus battling the Cyclops. Icarus learning the joy of flight. And…the officials involved in RMS Titanic? Though fables and ancient Greek plays are usually the works people think of when hubris is mentioned, McCafferty’s Titanic (Scenes from the British Wreck Commissioner's Inquiry, 1912) reminds audiences that hubris remains a tragic characteristic of real-life human behavior and thought no matter what century it is. Hubris has a significant presence in the legacy of Titanic. McCafferty’s creative reframing of the actual inquiry amplifies the shared, undeniably flawed humanity of those who were on the ship and those who never set foot on its boards. The ship’s creators and investors were so enthralled by the magnitude of their own creation, and the potential profit from it, that they tragically overlooked risks and necessary precautions. Branding the ship as “unsinkable” dares the hand of fate, a challenge to the tumultuous seas and their hidden perils that is reminiscent of the most prominent and painful moments of hubris in fiction. The term was used with glowing pride as monetary gain and fame eclipsed practicality in the eyes of those in charge, a phenomenon manifested in the very inventory of items on the ship—there were more than enough grand pianos but not enough lifeboats. The objects themselves represent a skewered value system, with wealth taking precedence over life.  The notable difference in numbers of those who survived when categorized by class is chilling. Although third class passengers outnumbered first and second class passengers, fewer of them survived. The working crew had the smallest percent of their numbers survive. The design of the ship and where each class was sequestered also posed questions of accessibility, as the third class passengers were placed in the more disadvantageous quarters and greeted by passageways they were not told led to escape routes. While on the ship, passengers were prioritized by class, the first and second class passengers favored with presumably better treatment and obviously better amenities. They were valued by the capacity and content of their coffers. In a perilous situation, trappings of morality were often shed as some focused primarily on their own survival even when in a position to help others. The marked class differences in survivors serves as a discomfiting microcosm that reminds generations such divisions still exist. This realization forces audiences to reevaluate the tragedy of Titanic as a looking glass into their everyday lives as they are challenged to see how current social hierarchies mirror those on the ship. 

File:Titanic wreck bow.jpgIt is important to note many passengers did assist others and some sacrificed themselves in the process. People helped one another board the lifeboats and there are countless memorable stories, like those of the musicians who played onboard as the ship sank and the postal workers who refused to leave without their parcels of important messages. The events of the wreck are memorialized in public awareness because they challenge people to consider how they themselves would act in similar situations. The stories from the tragedy confront people with different aspects of their humanity, from hubris to sacrifice to fervent self-preservation. In the play, scenes from the actual British inquiry are selected, and such scenes make it evident that many of the survivors were desperate to shed the burden of recognition, adamantly framing their actions as done because of someone or something out of their control. Officers repeat that their questionable orders came from a superior official they had to obey without question, and passengers deny the questionable nature of their actions. The committee overviewing the investigation passes character judgement when they themselves could not say what they would have done in a similar situation.

File:Titanic II.jpgTitanic poses uncomfortable questions to those who study the events surrounding it as they are left to contemplate how they would act, appraising themselves in terms of “am I more of a Duff Gordon or one of the nameless engineers who helped the ship stay afloat for an extra hour? Someone in between? Is it right to even categorize myself as such?” These questions, whether appropriate or not, never yield a truthful response until the individual is greeted with a moment that challenges them beyond their assumptions and beliefs. Only the inevitable holds the answer. Evaluating the events of Titanic in critical terms does not undermine the tragedy, instead encouraging self-reflection  of one’s own behavior when faced with the inconceivable and of how human creations often reflect the vulnerabilities and flaws of their creators.

For more information on how to stream Court's rendition of this legendary story, visit here." ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2021-06-04 12:44:55" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["post_title"]=> string(15) "Titanic: Legacy" ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["slug"]=> string(14) "titanic-legacy" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_edit_lock"]=> string(13) "1622828674:12" ["_edit_last"]=> string(2) "12" ["_yoast_wpseo_content_score"]=> string(2) "30" ["article_description"]=> string(37) "Reflect on the legacy of RMS Titanic." ["_article_description"]=> string(19) "field_5927045f742d7" ["article_byline"]=> string(58) "By Carissa Villagomez, Marketing and Communications Intern" ["_article_byline"]=> string(19) "field_592de516b020a" ["add_feed"]=> string(1) "0" ["_add_feed"]=> string(19) "field_5939a562bed44" ["_yoast_wpseo_primary_category"]=> string(2) "14" ["_yoast_wpseo_estimated-reading-time-minutes"]=> string(1) "4" ["_thumbnail_id"]=> string(5) "15926" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-06-04 17:44:55" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(14) "titanic-legacy" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2021-06-04 12:46:52" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-06-04 17:46:52" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["guid"]=> string(37) "https://www.courttheatre.org/?p=15051" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["status"]=> string(7) "publish" } } --> Productions - Court Theatre
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Productions

An Incredibly Immersive and Intimate Experience

In November, Court Theatre had the privilege of hosting nearly 600 UChicago students attending performances of The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice. We asked students to share a brief reflection on the production. UChicago student Camila Silva submitted the outstanding entry posted here. Many thanks to Camila and all the students who experienced this production!

Process and Evolution

How did more than a year of salon conversations inform Court's production of THE TRAGEDY OF OTHELLO, THE MOOR OF VENICE? Learn more in this blog focusing on the role of Assistant Director and Associate Dramaturg Abigail Henkin.

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